The last ten percent

The last ten percent

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What intrigued me most about design is that it sounded like it was always changing, so it wouldn’t be repetitive, and it sounded like I would have a new challenge to solve for in a visual way every day.
My mom was an art teacher, and my father worked for a furniture manufacturing company in the area. My mom always brought supplies home, and we set up spaces within our home to be as creative as we wanted. It was never a problem to get messy and creative at home.
I was always fascinated with how things functioned and worked. I would go through our house and actually take apart door knobs and door handles and disassemble them, then reassemble them to see if I could get them to not stick or just to take them apart and figure out how they functioned. I just thought it was so fascinating to see.

The last 10%
In my mind, designing an experience is about considering all the aspects of it. It’s not just thinking about the space, it’s thinking about the way a person navigates through the space and the subtle touch points that you may put into the space that speak back to the ultimate design intent.
For me, emotion is a part of the whole design process—especially that last ten percent. I think that’s whenever a person connects with the emotions you were feeling when you made a design. Ultimately, that last ten percent is how they walk away with the emotion you wanted them to feel.
The last ten percent of design is the extra effort that makes a project great. It’s not giving up whenever it’s good enough—it’s refining the details to make sure it speaks cohesively as a design. It requires you to be vulnerable and open to change. That extra attention and effort are things that OFS doesn’t take lightly because the results show in the long run.
What I like most about my job is working with the team of creatives here. I think that the most rewarding thing is seeing how ideas come together to produce something bigger. That’s the ultimate—to work at a company where you actually consider your co-workers friends or family. I mean, there’s nothing better than that.

The last ten percent